Song 196: "Donald Macgillavry" - James Hogg

Donald's gone up the hill tired and hungry,
Donald came down the hill wild and angry,
Donald will clear the cuckoo's nest cleverly,
Here is to the king and Donald McGillavry,
Come like a judge, Donald McGillavry,
Come like a judge, Donald McGillavry,
Balance them fair, and balance them cleverly:
Get rid of the counterfeit, Donald McGillavry.
 
Donald's ran over the hill without his leash,
As if he were mad or (bitten by) an adder, man:
When he comes back, some will be happy:
Here is to King James and Donald Mcgillavry.
Come like a weaver, Donald Mcgillavry,
Come like a weaver, Donald Mcgillavry,
A pack on your back, and measuring stick so clever;
Give them a full measure, my Donald Mcgillavry.
 
Donald has fought with thievery and dishonesty;
Donald has dinner with wrong-doers and beggers,
It would be better for Whigs and Whiggery,
To meet the devil (rather) than Donald Mcgillavry.
Come like a tailor, Donald Mcgillavry,
Come like a tailor, Donald Mcgillavry,
Push them about, in and out, thimble them cleverly,
Here is to King James and Donald Mcgillavry.
 
Donald's a fine man who breaks (away) from schemes;
Politicking and high airs, and new fangled things,
They must be gone: he will not be held back,
He must have justice, or faith he will take it, man.
Come like a cobbler, Donald Mcgillavry,
Come like a cobbler, Donald Mcgillavry,
Beat them, and bore them, and sew them cleverly,
Up with King James and Donald Mcgillavry.
 
Donald was lulled with deals and mockery,
Donald was blinded with dreams of property;
Bribes were many, but rewards were nothing, man,
Lord, how Donald is quarreling and worrying, man,
Come like the devil, Donald Mcgillavry,
Come like the devil, Donald Mcgillavry,
Slap them and scold them that prove so unbrotherly,
Up with King James and Donald Mcgillavry!

Donald's gane up the hill hard and hungry,
Donald's come down the hill wild and angry;
Donald will clear the gouk's nest cleverly,
Here's to the king and Donald Macgillavry.
Come like a weighbauk, Donald Macgillavry,
Come like a weighbauk, Donald Macgillavry,
Balance them fair, and balance them cleverly:
Off wi'the counterfeit, Donald Macgillavry.
 
Donald's run o'er the hill but his tether, man,
As he were wud, or stang'd wi' an ether, man;
When he comes back, there's some will look merrily:
Here's to King James and Donald Macgillavry.
Come like a weaver, Donald Macgillavry,
Come like a weaver, Donald Macgillavry,
Pack on your back, and elwand sae cleverly;
Gie them full measure, my Donald Macgillavry.
 
Donald has foughten wi' rief and roguery;
Donald has dinner'd wi banes and beggary,
Better it were for Whigs and Whiggery
Meeting the devil than Donald Macgillavry.
Come like a tailor, Donald Macgillavry,
Come like a tailor, Donald Macgillavry,
Push about, and in and out, thimble them cleverly,
Here's to King James and to Donald Macgillavry.
 
Donald's the callan that brooks nae tangleness;
Whigging and prigging and a'newfangleness,
They maun be gane: he winna be baukit, man:
He maun hae justice, or faith he'll tak it, man.
Come like a cobler, Donald Macgillavry,
Come like a cobler, Donald Macgillavry;
Beat them, and bore them, and lingel them cleverly,
Up wi' King James and Donald Macgillavry.
 
Donald was mumpit wi mirds and mockery;
Donald was blinded wi' blads o' property;
Arles ran high, but makings were naething, man,
Lord, how Donald is flyting and fretting, man.
Come like the devil, Donald Macgillavry,
Come like the devil, Donald Macgillavry;
Skelp them and scaud them that proved sae unbritherly,
Up wi King James and Donald Macgillavry!

 

Notes:
(Taken from here)
"The Stuart kings tried to take power away from Parliament with often disastrous results. Eventually this lead to James II being kicked off the throne by his son-in-law, a Dutchman named William of Orange. The people who considered James the true king were called Jacobites.

However, none of this matters because this song was unknown to the Jacobites. In fact, it was first published in 1819 by a man named James Hogg.

Hogg was a Scottish poet and novelist, as well as an early parodist. He was very popular for his time, but among his most well known works was Jacobite Reliques, a collection of Jacobite (and some Whig) songs. Donald MacGillavry was among the Jacobite ones and described by Hogg as, “…one of the best songs that ever was made…a capital old song, and very popular.” He goes on to explain an entirely fictitious history for the song, hearkening back to the 1715 and 1745 Jacobite risings in Scotland, talking about two obscure soldiers in those wars with the last name MacGillavry, expounding on how because they were a minor sub-clan and not associated with powerful warring factions, they were used as a symbol for a united Scotland, etc. Seriously, read it yourself."